Page #4
of the

25 HP Swan Restoration

Continued...


25 HP Swan

See
Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6, Page 7, Page 8, Page 9, Page 10,
for more of the 25 HP Swan Restoration project.


These 2 photos show most of all the governor parts primed and waiting for some more paint and assenbly work and the second photo is of more parts that have gotten sand blasted...



This is a photo of the last governor part that I have to get apart. There is a shaft inside this housing that is rusted solid. I have heated the housing up a few times and let it cool and have broken all the rust free using the sand blaster. There was a cross pin in the shaft that rides in the vertical slot of the housing. I drilled this pin out as you can see in the photo. This pin limits the stroke of the throttle. The part is now soaking while I work on other things...



Well I made a trip to one of my good friends machine shop the other day and he had a couple of parts ready for me. A few weeks ago I made up some drawings and ask him if he could make the parts for me cause they were to big for my lathe. My friends name is Dave Johnson and he owns a large machine shop that repairs hydraulic cylinders and he also can make them from scratch. Dave also is an engine collector so he understands alot about this hobby and is a great help! Well here in these photos you can see the new head and the locating plate for the cylinder sleeve. What a great job Dave did making these parts for me. Thanks Dave...



There are 4 tabs that locate the cylinder locating plate to the machine base that needed to be welded on. In these photos you can see how I did this. I used a jack screw to hold the tab for welding which the first photo shows. The next photo shows all 4 tabs welded on. Then in the next 2 photos they show the setup I used in the lathe to turn the four tabs to fit the bore in the main engine base to locate the cylinder sleeve on center. You will see in a few more photos how this is done if I didn't explain that good enough...



Here are 2 photos showing me drilling 3 holes in the cylinder sleeve locating plate. They are for mounting the plate to the engine base. I used my drill press which runs off of the line-shaft that a 5 HP Economy powers...



In this photo you can see the cylinder sleeve locating plate mounted on the engine base. There will be a gasket that goes between the engine base and plate. The plate came out real good. I can't wait to start getting the cylinder mounted back on the engine...



Well after a lot of heat and a little bit of pressure the shaft is out of the governor housing. It was pretty stubborn but with a little heat, soaking, pressing, and patience the shaft became free and no parts were broken. The third photo here shows the nasty shaft that was rusted in the governor housing...



These photos speak for themselves. More parts for the governor mounting and intake valve chest get sand blasted and primed...



A good friend of mine Otto Dole came over the shop to help me clean up the ways of the cross-head on the base. He bought with him a piston sander which really has done a good job smoothing up the ways. This type of sander kept the ways nice and flat also. Thanks Otto...



Well here it was February 16th, 1999 and the temp outside was in the low 50's, the sun was out and Otto and I just had to uncover an engine and fire her up. This was the first time all winter the 10 HP Fairbanks Morse NB has been run. We oiled her up good, spun her over a few times, sucked a fresh charge into the combustion chamber, and sha-zam, she came to life. What a great day!...



In these 2 photos I have the gasket cut and in place with the sleeve locating plate. I shouldn't have to take this off again but you never know. The gasket material is 1/8 thick and is pretty tough to work with, but is very sturdy and durable...




Here are the governor and side shaft gears. I had to order these and they just came in. I can't wait to start machining them and getting them on the engine. I have to bore them out to fit the shafts and also machine the hubs to size...



Well the sleeve makes it onto the engine! This is a big accomplishment. It is just being held on with c-clamps but this is fine for now. The whole sleeve water jacket and valve chests are held on with 6 long tie rods which you saw eariler. Boy is this engine starting to get longer...



I put the piston in the bore minus the rings and have also put the old connecting rod in, plus the cross head. I am doing this to get some measurements for the length of the new connecting rod I am making. It makes you feel good when things start going together and the project looks like an engine again ...



In these 2 photos I have the piston mounted in a 4 jaw chuck and am boring a hole 1 3/4 in diameter for the new connecting rod. This is quite a big chunk of cast iron to swing in the lathe but I turned it slow and fed the carriage slow, and with cast iron machining so easy the job came out great. The new connecting rod fits like a glove...



This is a flange I am turning and boring a hole in that will get welded to the new connecting rod. This will be on the back side of the piston and will take all the forces on the power stroke...



This is the start of the new connecting rod. It is 1 3/4" diameter by 38" long with a 1 inch wide flange that backs up against a machined area of the piston. I just welded the flange to the rod in this photo. Next I will set it up in the lathe...



Below shows the setup of the connecting rod in the lathe. I am going to turn the O.D. of the flange to 4" and face the far side of the flange. Also I used the steady rest to support the shaft where the work is going to be done. It took a few minutes to indicate the connecting rod at the chuck end and then at the steady rest end. I then center drilled the end for a live center to be used...



These next 2 photos show the O.D. of the flange being turned down to 4". Next I will face the flange and cut a 1 3/4" - 5 thread on this end of the connecting rod. This thread will lock the piston onto the connecting rod with a heavy nut...



The following 3 photos are at different stages of turning a 1 3/4 - 5 thread on the end of the connecting rod. This is the largest thread I have cut on my lathe so as the thread went deeper I took lighter cuts. The thread came out really nice so I guess a little patience paid off. This is the thread that will hold the piston onto the connecting rod...



The first photo shows the 1 3/4 nut on the newly turned threads and in the second photo the connecting rod is in the piston with the nut in place. I assembled this to see how everything was going to fit. The third photo is a rear view of the connecting rod assembled in the piston...



On the other end of the connecting rod I needed to turn a shoulder down to 1 1/4 diameter and then turn a 1 1/4 - 7 thread. In the first photo I am roughing the 1 1/4 diameter and facing the shoulder. The second photo is of the thread before I took a couple of cleanup passes...



In this photo I just finished polishing up the rod. I removed the steady- rest from the lathe and increased the rpms and used 3 different grits of sand paper to get the rod to shine...



Here are 2 photos of the finished connecting rod with the nuts on each end. I know it looks like a simple part but there was a lot of time spent setting things up and machining them...



This photo shows everything assembled, piston, connecting rod, and cross- head. The cross-head still needs to be cleaned up and babbitt poured but I was just checking to see how things are going to fit. Also to check out all my measurements...



See
Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6, Page 7, Page 8, Page 9, Page 10,
for more of the 25 HP Swan Restoration project.


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