Shop Work Page #8


shop photo

This webpage shows the current jobs
being worked on in the shop.
Hope you enjoy the activity.



See
Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6, Page 7, Page 8, Page 9, Page 10, Page 11, Page 12, Page 13,
Page 14, Page 15, Page 16, Page 17, Page 18, Page 19, Page 20, Page 21, Page 22, Page 23, Page 24, Page 25,
Page 26, Page 27, Page 28, Page 29, Page 30, Page 31, Page 32, Page 33, Page 34, Page 35, Page 36, Page 37,
Page 38, Page 39, Page 40, Page 41, Page 42, Page 43, Page 44, Page 45, Page 46, Page 47, Page 48, Page 49, Page 50,

for more Shop Work.


In photo #1 you can see the clutch assembled, with the clutch cone getting ready to make contact with the (2) clutch dogs. I built up the (2) clutch dogs with weld and reground the radius on them where they meet up with the clutch cone. In photo #2 you and see the clutch cone pushed all the way in and the (2) clutch dogs spread out which fully engages the clutch...


The (2) brass followers which slide the clutch cone in and out were really worn down. These are the parts that see all the wear over the years of engaging and disengaging the clutch. What I did to make the brass followers thicker was screw (2) #10-24 brass screws in the side of each follower. In Photo #1 the (2) holes are being drilled in the side of the follower. Photo #2 shows tapping the holes and photo #3 shows what the follower looks like with the (2) brass screws in it. I then ground the heads down to get the proper thickness so the followers fit the clutch cone groove with out any side play. This also takes all the slop out of the clutch when you are engaging and disengaging...


This photo shows the clutch all assembled and working great. It took about 3 tries to get the adjustments right on the clutch but it was worth all the time put into it. Now to get all the covers back on to cover up the drive area for safety...


Well back to work on the 3" toolholder for boring the Pohl cylinder. Photo #1 is of center drilling and Photo #2 is of facing off the end. Photo #3 is of the drawing I made for the 3" diameter toolholder. Photo #4 shows starting to drill the center hole. I need to finish bore this center hole to a diameter of 1.501, to except the support bar that goes out to the out board bearing to stabilize the spindle and cutting tool...


In photo #1 I am turning the shank of a 1.125 diameter drill down to 1.000 so I can get it into the Jacobs chuck on the tailstock. Drilling the hole as large as you can with leaving some material for boring, really saves a lot of time. Photo #2 shows the 1.125 diameter drill in action. Photo #3 shows boring the center hole to a diameter of 1.501...


On Saturday January 11th, I went over to my friend, Dave Johnson's shop to help him pour the main bearings on a 15 HP Titusville Olin he is currently restoring. The next (5) photos show some of the days work we did. Photo #1 shows heating up the bed plate to cook out any moisture. Photo #2 & #3 shows the bottom halves of the mains poured. Photo #4 shows what the set up looked like for pouring the upper halves of the main bearings. Photo #5 shows pouring one of the upper mains. The bearings came out great and with a little more scraping and fitting they will be ready to except the crankshaft...


In this photo I am parting off the 3" boring toolholder in the lathe...


In these next (3) photos my friend Dave Yorks and myself are putting a crankshaft from an 18 HP Electric Lighting Buffalo Olin in the lathe to run an indicator accross the shaft to see if it is bent. Photos #1 & #2 shows getting the crankshaft into the lathe. Photo #3 shows running the indicator down the shaft. The crankshaft wasn't bent at all...


Here in photo #1 you can see the layout on the 3" boring tool face for the mounting holes and the slot where the actual cutter goes. Photo #2 shows center drilling for the (2) mounting holes. Photo #3 shows counter sinking the (2) mounting holes. Photo #4 is the start of milling the slot for the actual tool holder...


In photo #1 you can see the slot the cutting tool will go into all completed. Photo #2 shows milling the flats where the set screws that hold the cutting tool will be drilled from. Photo #3 is of drilling the holes to be threaded for the set screws...


Photo #1 shows tapping the (2) holes to a 5/16-18 thread for the set screws that will clamp the cutting tool in place. Photo #2 is of the completed 3" boring tool after all deburring is done. This is the smallest diameter boring tool of this type that I can use on the Lucas Horizontal Boring Mill with out making a special adapter shaft. The diameter of the machine spindle is 3" but to bore a smaller hole I would have to use a boring bar fitted to the 3" spindle. Not a problem. Photo #3 shows the 3" boring tool mounted on the Lucas spindle. Its now ready for action. The next step now will be to get the cylinder indicated into position and start sending the boring tool through...


Well this is what the set up is going to look like. In photo #1 which is the head side of the engine, you can see the 3" boring tool and the stabilizing bar that supports the cutter during boring. Photo #2 is looking in through the side of the crank case. Notice the boring tool is fully extended as if it were at the end of the cut. Photo #3 is a view of the entire set up. The spindle in this photo is fully extended too...


Now to indicate the cylinder for boring. This is where a lot of time is spent. Photo #1 shows an indicator set up on the machine table with it contacting the engine. This way I can keep track of how far I am moving the engine during the alignment phase. Photo #2 is of indicating the machined face for the head. This will get the cylinder bore location real close, and then the next step will be indicating the actual cylinder bore as you can see in photo #3, which was taken from inside the crank case looking right at the machine spindle and indicator. The power feed on the machine is moving the indicator towards the camera in photo #3...


Well here we go, we're making chips. Photo #1 was taken looking at the back of the bore through the crank case. Photo #2 is taken with the camera right in the crank case looking towards the machine spindle. Photo #3 shows (2) roughing passes completed and the bore is starting to clean up...


Before starting to take the finish passes on the bore, I reworked a cemented carbide cutter in the vertical mill. In photo #1 I am taking the thickness down so I could shim the cutter to the centerline of the spindle. Photo #2 was taken from inside the crank case looking towards the machine spindle at the finished bore. Photo #3 is of the finished bore from the head end. I am very happy how the bore finished up. No more pitting and taper in the new bore...


Now for the next cylinder bore job. Photo #1 shows putting a 15 HP International Famous cylinder on the Lucas Horizontal Boring Mill. Photo #2 shows the Famous cylinder on the machine table...


Here in photo #1 you can see the crankshaft for the 3 HP Pohl Diesel Engine in the lathe. I need to do a little work on the bearing journals and the through. You can see in photo #2 the shape the crankshaft is in...



Shop Work Continued on Page #9
See
Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6, Page 7, Page 8, Page 9, Page 10, Page 11, Page 12, Page 13,
Page 14, Page 15, Page 16, Page 17, Page 18, Page 19, Page 20, Page 21, Page 22, Page 23, Page 24, Page 25,
Page 26, Page 27, Page 28, Page 29, Page 30, Page 31, Page 32, Page 33, Page 34, Page 35, Page 36, Page 37,
Page 38, Page 39, Page 40, Page 41, Page 42, Page 43, Page 44, Page 45, Page 46, Page 47, Page 48, Page 49, Page 50,

for more Shop Work.





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