Page #7


of the



This engine is a 4 cycle cross head
designed engine with an 11" Bore & 18" Stroke.
There is one huge 5 1/2'
diameter flywheel. The engine was the fore runner
to both the Buffalo and Titusville Olins.



See
Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6, Page 7, Page 8, Index
for more of the 20 HP Abel Acme Restoration project.

In this photo you can see the flat machined on the flange of the main housing assembly. Not much machine work left to do on the main housing assembly...


The intake valve stem needs to be lubricated. This is quite a tricky thing to do, get the oil from the oiler, through the main housing assembly, through the gas chamber, and then through the air passage way, to the valve stem. This photo shows a 1/8" NPT pipe coupling welded to the main housing assembly, with an oiler screwed in to see what it would look like. I drilled a hole through the main housing assembly tubing so the oil can flow through it...


In photo #1 I am drilling a hole through the intake valve assembly and through the guide for the valve stem. The guide will be threaded for a 1/8" NPT pipe thread. This tube will carry the oil to the valve stem. Photo #2 shows the little tube screwed in place. Photo #3 shows turning the little tube to length in the lathe. The tube needs to fit the I.D. of the main housing assembly bore as good as the O.D. of the intake valve assembly does. This way oil will not get sucked into the engine on the intake stroke and possibly not make it to the valve stem...


This photo shows the main housing assembly and the intake valve assembly all assembled. You can see the little tube that goes through the air passage way, which carries the oil to the intake valve stem...


In these (4) photos you can see the holes put into the seat for the gas to come through. In photo #1 you can see an original gas valve barrel and the new one next to each other. Notice the holes in the seat of the original part. Photo #2, I blued the seat and layed out the holes, and then drilled them. Photo #3 you can see all (28) holes, .093 diameter, drilled in the seat and de-burred. Photo #4 was takin after the valve and seat were lapped. When I get the Abel Acme engine running, if I need more gas through the seat I can always add more holes or open up the ones I just drilled in...


This photo shows an oil hole drilled in the gas valve guide to keep the stem of the gas valve lubricated...


Photo #1 here shows a 4 1/2" diameter piece of heavy wall tubing that I have started cutting the threads on. This will be the air intake pipe that will screw into the main housing assembly and hold the gas valve assembly in place. Photo #2 shows the main housing assembly screwed onto the tube, trying out the threads. Photo #3 shows the completed threads, (16 TPI) all de-burred. Photo #4 shows everything assembled and ready for action. Well I need to finish fabricating the air intake pipe...


One of the last things to do to the main housing assembly is to lapp the gas valve and seat. In photo #1 you can see the valve all lapped and in photo #2 you can see the seat. Now the rest of the work on the main housing assembly will just be cosmetic...


This photo is of a piece of 2" thick steel, flame cut to 16.75 diameter. This is going to become the head for the Abel Acme engine. A good engine friend of mine was abel to get the material and cut it on an automatic burn table for me. Thanks Dave! Now to get it ready to go into the lathe...


Photo #1 shows a piece of 9" diameter tubing in the lathe getting trued up. This tubing will get welded to the head so it can be mounted in the lathe. Photo #2 shows the tube all completed. Notice the chamfer for welding and that the tube is now flat. This tube will be cut off the head when all the machining is done on the cylinder side of the head...


In photo #1 you can see the tube welded to the head. Photo #2 shows it all mounted in the lathe and ready for turning. I am going to turn the back side of the head first, the side that mounts towards the engine...


In these (4) photos you can see the head being turned on the lathe. Photo #1 shows facing the back side of the head that is not entirely cleaned up. Photo #2 shows the same surfaced all cleaned up. Photo #3 is an action shot (photo was taken while cutting) of turning the O.D. Photo #4 shows all the slag turned from the O.D. and now just needs to be taken down to the finished diameter of 16.25...


In this photo I am truing up a second ring out of a piece of heavy wall tubing, 9" O.D. by 1/2" wall. Just like the previous one made earlier. What I am planning to do is weld it to the backside of the head (the side being machined right now) while it is still mounted in the lathe with the other tube, and then true the O.D. of the new tube for quick locating when I flip the head around. Everything will then be concentric. Hope this makes sence...


Here in these (2) photos you can see the counter-bored hole on the cylinder side of the head taking shape. Photo #1 shows the second pass on the counter-bore and it is just becoming visable. Photo #2 you can really see the counter-bore defined now. This counter-bore will be 1" deep. What I am doing with the counter-bore is lowering the compression ratio by making the combustion chamber larger...


In the first photo here you can see the outside diameter of the counter-bore being cut. This diameter matches the bore diameter of the cylinder. Photo #2 shows the cylinder side of the head all completed...


With the backside of the head completed, I then welded a 9" diameter ring to it. In photo #1 you can see the head turned around in the lathe, the new ring is welded into the counter-bore, and I am indicating the head getting everything true. I changed the process I originally planned, of welding the tube to the head and truing it up before rotating it. Either way I still would have had to indicate the head, this way I didn't have to weld the parts while setup in the lathe. Photo #2, I am getting ready to cut the first 9" diameter tube off of the front side of the head...


In photo #1 I am making the first pass on the front side of the head. Photo #2 shows the surface all cleaned up...




See
Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6, Page 7, Page 8, Index
for more of the 20 HP Abel Acme Restoration project.

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